Club Colorado

Why It’s Good to Be a Colorado 5th Grader

by Guest on Oct.13, 2012, under General

This blog comes to Colorado Ski Country from Kristen Lummis of braveskimom.com

My boys, like most kids, are all about growing up. They want to be taller, older, able to do more things and go more places independently. Once they left grade school, they deemed it “the worst.” Middle school is now something to tolerate on the way to high school. While I want time to slow down, they want it to speed up. They don’t want to look back or go back. Except for, maybe, 5th grade.

Kristen Lummis

Kristen Lummis

It’s not that 5th grade was so special, or more fun, than other school years. It was because in 5th grade, as Colorado students, each boy got a Colorado Ski Country USA 5th grade pass.

You know what that means, right? Three free days at each of 20 Colorado ski resorts. And 6th grade isn’t too bad either, with four free days at each participating resort for only $99.

Hit The Highway

While one could argue that one free ticket (out of four, in the case of our family) does not a bargain make, there’s something about having a pass in hand that makes even the most conscientious parents a bit giddy. When our oldest son hit 5th grade, we hit the road. Before the season started, we mapped out where we wanted to go and bought multi-day passes. We bought 6 packs for Crested Butte, 4 packs at Copper Mountain and Aspen Classic passes. We also got CSCUSA Gem Cards and kept our eyes open for coupons and other special deals. With just a little pre-planning, we all skied at a discount and explored resorts, both large and small, that we might not have visited otherwise.

Take A Friend

Several years ago, a friend who was in 5th grade, decided that skiing was his sport.  His parents were thrilled, but with two younger children at home, they couldn’t get away very often. Since this boy had a 5th grade pass, we ended up taking him along on many of our ski days. I will never forget taking him to Snowmass. It was the first really big mountain he’d seen, let alone skied. As we drove up to park at the base, the look on his face was priceless. So was his ticket. Later that season, we took him with us to Copper Mountain for an overnight trip. It was here that he explored his first big terrain park. Inspired, he went to Woodward at Copper for summer camp. All thanks to a 5th grade pass and a family with an empty seat in their car.

Learn Something New

If your son or daughter has never skied or snowboarded, another big advantage of the 5th grade pass is the First Class lesson program. During the month of January, 5th graders who have never skied or snowboarded can take one free lesson, including free rental equipment. Usually, one beginner lesson is enough to advance a child from never-ever to advanced beginner with the confidence to go out and try skiing or riding again! If your 5th grader, or a 5th grader you know, wants to learn a snowsport, there is no more economical way to get them started.

Crested Butte_Kristen Lummis

Crested Butte_Kristen Lummis

Forget Tween Angst

So those are my reasons why it’s good to be a Colorado 5th (and 6th) grader. Forget the pre-teen drama, the concern over who is choosing whom for kickball and pre-middle school jitters. Forget about bad hair days, pants that are suddenly too short and lockers that won’t open. Just remember to get a 5th or 6th grade pass. It won’t make your child grow up faster (you wouldn’t want that anyway), but it will make these two years so much more fun.

It’s good to be a 5th grader in Colorado. It’s also good to be their parents.

Enjoy!

The Colorado Ski Country USA 5th and 6th Grade is available now through January 31, 2013. Apply online at passport.coloradoski.com. Because the total number of passes to be issued is limited, you are encouraged to apply as soon as possible. It takes just a few minutes and you’ll be on your way to a winter of family fun!

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