How to Capture the Perfect Ski Instagram

on March 3 | in Insider Secrets, Uncategorized | by | with No Comments

Cell phone cameras were the best and worst thing to happen to photography, as it is easier than ever to pull out your device and capture a fleeting moment. But with this effortlessness comes mindlessness. Too often people whip out their phones, shoot something without even looking at the result and move on. Instead of just blasting away, take these tips into account next time you’re trying to take a photo on the slopes for the perfect ski Instagram.

Exhibit A: Owen hanging out and enjoying the view after a quick hike up the Highlands Bowl.

Exhibit A: Owen hanging out and enjoying the view after a quick hike up the Highlands Bowl.

  1. The first tip is to create depth in your pictures. Try stacking each part of the photo with interesting details to keep viewers engaged. For example, the photo below has the “Highlands” sign in the foreground, the subject towards the center, and Maroon Bells as the background, making for a layered composition with a lot to look at.
Exhibit B: What goes up must come down.

Exhibit B: What goes up must come down.

Exhibit C. Outerwear, helmets, and board color coordination never hurt a picture, either.

Exhibit C: Outerwear, helmets, and board color coordination never hurt a picture, either.

  1. Secondly, use burst photo to capture those high speed action shots. The iPhone can shoot 10 frames per second, ensuring that you never miss the movement. Just hold down the shutter button and fire.
Exhibit D. Surf’s up on the Highlands Bowl!

Exhibit D: Surf’s up on the Highlands Bowl!

  1. Next, include a subject for scale. A model can help people relate to the photo (this is why Instagram photos with people in them always get more likes), and it also shows how massive these mountains are that you’re playing in.
Exhibit E: Yours truly in the bottom right corner demonstrating what it takes to get the shot.

Exhibit E: Yours truly in the bottom right corner demonstrating what it takes to get the shot.

  1. Do not shoot standing up. Lay down, kneel, or climb a tree. This will add a new perspective to your photos. Getting low will make a drop or jump look bigger than it actually is, while staying high will give you a cool overhead perspective making the object look small.
Exhibit F: Does this look familiar? @notdannycuadrado showing exactly what not to do.

Exhibit F: Does this look familiar? @notdannycuadrado showing exactly what not to do.

  1. No offense, but please do not take a selfie on the chair, or throw your poles up on a groomer while stopping traffic so you can get your picture. Both of these are about as cliché as it gets…
Exhibit G: Ooohhh, ahhhhh!

Exhibit G: Ooohhh, ahhhhh!

  1. Find interesting forms to shoot, like rocks, broken trees, or snowbanks. Keep your eye out for what some would call a “hipster” composition.
Exhibit H: You might even consider sitting on this chair for another go around with views like this over on Aspen Mountain.

Exhibit H: You might even consider sitting on this chair for another go around with views like this over on Aspen Mountain.

  1. Skiing is not all blower pow and hucking cliffs, so feel free to include the little moments that make the sport special, like aprés and scenic lift rides.
  1. Lastly, and most importantly, shoot, but don’t overshoot. You should be there to actually ski or ride, rather than prove to your friends that you went skiing. Please do not get hung up staring through your phone screen and your follower ratio because you will miss the glory that’s happening behind it.

 

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